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Frank Shostak

Tags Financial Markets

Works Published inQuarterly Journal of Austrian EconomicsAustrian Economics NewsletterMises Daily Article

Frank Shostak's consulting firm, Applied Austrian School Economics, provides in-depth assessments of financial markets and global economies. Contact: email.

Frank Shostak is an Associated Scholar of the Mises Institute. His consulting firm, Applied Austrian School Economics, provides in-depth assessments and reports of financial markets and global economies. He received his bachelor's degree from Hebrew University, master's degree from Witwatersrand University and PhD from Rands Afrikaanse University, and has taught at the University of Pretoria and the Graduate Business School at Witwatersrand University.

All Works

High Prices Don't Cause Economic Bubbles

Money and BanksMoney and Banking

Blog16 hours ago
Bubbles aren't created by price increases. They're created by central-bank induced misallocation of resources.

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Why Government Spending Matters More than the Size of the Deficit

Taxes and SpendingPolitical Theory

Blog02/23/2017
The only meaningful contribution the government can make to people’s living standards is by focusing on a reduction in government spending.

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Debt Isn't a Problem — Easy-Money Policies Are the Problem

Money and BanksMoney and Banking

Blog02/16/2017
Debt can be a big factor in economic busts. But, the problem isn't debt. The problem is the easy-money policies behind the debt.

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"Real Wealth" vs. the Boom-Bust Cycle

Money and BanksMoney and Banking

Blog02/13/2017
In a boom-bust economy, there is real wealth, and there is bubble wealth. Economic busts are a "cleansing mechanism" that clears out the bubble wealth.

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Tightening the Money Supply will Inevitably Lead to a Bust

The FedMoney and BanksMoney and Banking

Blog02/02/2017
Economic busts are the inevitable removal of various activities that result from easy-money policy. Busts are unavoidable without endless "stimulus."

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